Monday, October 29, 2012

William Ginther's "Dedication"

The wait is over -- Anthony "Chip" Valleriano's book about architect William P. Ginther has been published by Kent State University Press.

Akron-based architect William P. Ginther (1858–1933) designed sixty-three Roman Catholic churches, primarily in Ohio and Pennsylvania. Dedication is the first book to document his architectural designs. By combining historical images with twenty-first-century photographs, author Anthony J. Valleriano presents the most comprehensive overview of Ginther’s architectural career available today.
The son of German immigrants, Ginther demonstrated considerable drawing skills at an early age. In grade school, he was known for illustrating pictures of the school building and grounds. As his skills advanced, Ginther was encouraged to study architecture at Buchtel College (now the University of Akron). Frank Wheary, a leading Akron architect of the time, spotted Ginther’s drawing talents and promptly put him to work. Under Wheary’s guidance, Ginther learned the craft of architectural drafting and engineering and helped design and supervise the construction of his first building, McKinley Church, in Canton, Ohio.

Ginther became one of the most influential ecclesiastical architects in Ohio during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The designer of churches in Cleveland, Akron, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Erie, Toledo, and many other communities, he defined the sense of sacred space for countless worshipers and enriched the aesthetic and religious lives of the region’s residents.

Available from Amazon and The Kent State University Press.

3 comments:

D.M. SOLIS said...

Very fine images! I very much appreciate the though and artfulness in your posts.

Peace and all good things for you in work and in life.

Sincerely,
Diane

Linda Jean Limes Ellis said...

The church on the cover is that of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Lorain, Ohio.

http://content.seekandfind.com/bulletins/14/0200/20121118B.pdf

Kevin Hammer said...

Looks like it's worth a visit!